provoke

01. Henry [provoked] his brother into fighting by teasing him, and then pulling his hair.
02. The police fired on the demonstrators without [provocation] of any kind.
03. The politician has made a number of [provocative] speeches which have drawn the anger of civil rights activists throughout the country.
04. Some guy at a bar tried to [provoke] him into a fight, but he wouldn't go for it.
05. The attack on the Amritsar temple [provoked] intense outrage among Sikhs throughout the world.
06. The young boy was [provoked] into stealing a car by his new friends.
07. She wore a tight, low-cut sweater, which was quite [provocative].
08. She continually [provokes] her little brother by telling him how stupid he is.
09. Seneca once said that anger, if not restrained, is frequently more hurtful to us than the injury that [provokes] it.
10. Experts say that many shark attacks are caused by people getting too close to sharks, or [provoking] and threatening them.
11. In rare instances, wounded or [provoked] lions may attack human beings.
12. The United States has said that it will not defend the island of Taiwan if it begins an [unprovoked] war of independence.
13. The human rights organization Amnesty International maintains that execution is an act of violence, and violence tends to [provoke] violence.
14. Most snakes that live near water are harmless, though some are easily [provoked] to bite.
15. Don't [provoke] that dog or he may bite you.

Grammatical examples in English. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Provoke — Pro*voke , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Provoked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Provoking}.] [F. provoquer, L. provocare to call forth; pro forth + vocare to call, fr. vox, vocis, voice, cry, call. See {Voice}.] To call forth; to call into being or action; esp., to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • provoke — 1 Provoke, excite, stimulate, pique, quicken, galvanize can all mean to rouse one into doing or feeling something or to call something into existence by so rousing a person. Provoke stresses a power in the agent or agency sufficient to produce… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • provoke — pro·voke /prə vōk/ vt pro·voked, pro·vok·ing 1: to incite to anger 2: to provide the needed stimulus for pro·vok·er n Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …   Law dictionary

  • provoke — [prə vōk′, prōvōk′] vt. provoked, provoking [ME provoken < MFr provoquer < L provocare, to call forth < pro , PRO 2 + vocare, to call < vox, VOICE] 1. to excite to some action or feeling 2. to anger, irritate, or annoy 3 …   English World dictionary

  • provoke — [v1] make angry abet, abrade, affront, aggravate, anger, annoy, bother, bug*, chafe, enrage, exasperate, exercise, foment, fret, gall*, get*, get on one’s nerves*, get under one’s skin*, grate, hit where one lives*, incense, incite, inflame,… …   New thesaurus

  • Provoke — Pro*voke , v. i. 1. To cause provocation or anger. [1913 Webster] 2. To appeal. Note: [A Latinism] [Obs.] Dryden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • provoke — early 15c., from O.Fr. provoker (14c., Fr. provoquer), from L. provocare call forth, challenge, from pro forth (see PRO (Cf. pro )) + vocare to call (see VOICE (Cf. voice)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • provoke — ► VERB 1) stimulate or cause (a strong or unwelcome reaction or emotion) in someone. 2) deliberately annoy or anger. 3) incite to do or feel something, especially by arousing anger. ORIGIN Latin provocare to challenge …   English terms dictionary

  • provoke — pro|voke [prəˈvəuk US ˈvouk] v [T] [Date: 1300 1400; : French; Origin: provoquer, from Latin provocare, from vocare to call ] 1.) to cause a reaction or feeling, especially a sudden one →↑provocation provoke a protest/an outcry/criticism etc ▪… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • provoke */*/ — UK [prəˈvəʊk] / US [prəˈvoʊk] verb [transitive] Word forms provoke : present tense I/you/we/they provoke he/she/it provokes present participle provoking past tense provoked past participle provoked 1) to deliberately try to make someone angry He… …   English dictionary

  • provoke — transitive verb (provoked; provoking) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French *provoker, provocher, from Latin provocare, from pro forth + vocare to call, from voc , vox voice more at pro , voice Date: 14th century 1. a. archaic to arouse to …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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